CFEBA Grant Recipients

 

Making a Difference

Take a look at how YOUR contributions are making a difference. With your help, the CFEBA has
provided support to various energy related programs focused on improving lives worldwide.

2018

Puerto Rico Primary Care Association

$100,000

to install integrated hybrid solar power systems that would power the refrigeration units at the primary care clinic delivery sites in its portfolio located throughout Puerto Rico. This project will address refrigeration needs for perishable medication such as insulin, vaccines, and certain liquid antibiotics and cancer medications.

Blue Triangle Multicultural Association, Inc

$25,000

for equipment, labor, other services, inspections and similar costs necessary and appropriate to install and make operational heating system improvements for the indoor pool area and electrical outlets/switches repair in the rooms affected by Hurricane Harvey

2017

Innovation Africa

$103,000

to provide life-changing solar water pump and drip irrigation technology to the Akuyam Village in Uganda.

2016

NRECA International Foundation

$150,000

focused on the life-changing electrification of several communities in the northeast region of Bolivia. This project will create profound change for many people who have never had electricity in their homes

2015

Global Solace

$10,000

to provide a fully functional solar-electric system and tools to a rural school and health clinic in Carcasse, Haiti.

Arlington Thrive, Inc

$10,000

This grant will be used to provide emergency financial assistance to Arlington residents who because of a sudden financial crisis are unable to pay their utility bills

2014

We Care Solar

$9,867

to provide the Light Up Tanzania program with four “Solar Suit cases” for use for nighttime deliveries of babies in rural maternity health clinics.

Eagle Energy for their Solar Entrepreneur Project

$10,000

which is aiding the Navajo Nation. Through the sale of solar products at swap meets and partnering with local shops, their Entrepreneur Project is advocating for a sustainable, market-based transition from fossil fuel to solar technologies that provide better-quality light, lower the cost of monthly energy expenses, and improve health.

Meals on Wheels Association of America

$20,000

to support the purchase by a regional Meals On Wheels program of a hybrid vehicle to be used in delivering meals to the ill and shut-in.

 

2013

Solar Liberty Foundation

$10,000

for equipment to complete a solar installation at a health clinic in Tanzania.

Arlington Thrive (formally AMEN)

$10,010

Arlington Thrive is a  local charity in Arlington, Virginia that provides same day emergency assistance for residents in crises and they used the CFEBA grant to fund utility bills of their clients

2012

SOME

$29,000

This grant was used to fund one-half of the costs of installation of a solar water heating system at Mellon Street, an affordable housing program located in Washington, DC, that SOME is developing.

Innovation Africa

$10,000

to drill a water well into the underlying aquifer, construct a water holding tank, and install solar panels and a solar-powered  pump to move water from the well to the tank.

Arlington Academy of Hope, Inc (Uganda School)

$15,000

to replace worn equipment and expand the solar energy system.

 

2011

The Friends of the Buea School for the Deaf

$12,500

This grant was utilized to support the interconnection of the Buea School to the transmission distribution grid.

Trees, Water, People

$15,000

to fund the fabrication and installation of efficient, supplemental solar air heating systems for 10 low-income tribal families living on reservations across the great plains

Grid Alternatives

$2,500

to support the Solar Affordable Housing Program.

2010

My Sister’s Place

$95,000

to fund high-efficiency heating, ventilating, and air conditioning equipment for a women’s shelter. The Foundation was particularly pleased to deliver these funds, as My Sister’s Place had endured a multi-year, uncertain process in securing the government funds that were the core of the financing for this project.

Medical Missionaries

$10,000

to pay fuel for the three trucks, one bus, one ambulance, and two generators (approx 100 kW each) to be used to move an immediate responder medical/surgical team, medical supplies, and food throughout Haiti in response to the earthquake.

Machik Corp.

$6,300

to purchase six solar water heaters for schools it operates in Tibet

2009

Global Playground

$18,000

which seeks to increase access to quality education in developing countries and to promote cross-cultural exchange of ideas among its schools in developing countries and partnership schools in the United States. The CFEBA provided monies to install solar panels at its schools in Uganda and Cambodia, so that these schools would have a sustainable energy source. 

Dollar Energy Fund

$10,000

Founded in 1983, Dollar Energy Fund is a 501(c)(3) based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and is the fourth largest fuel fund in the United States.  It currently serves individuals in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and West Virginia.

54th Street Apartments

$28,000

The building, which was constructed in partnership with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), was vacant due to a funding shortfall at HUD that prevented the purchase of appliances.  The CFEBA’s grant to purchase energy-efficient appliances enabled the building to open and immediately provide homes to eight families.

2008

Mudzini Wetu (Kenyan Orphanage)

$8,900

A CFEBA grant provided funds for the installation of solar panels at the Mudzini Kwetu orphanage in Kenya. The children now have enough electricity so they can study in the evening.

2007

 Aid To Distressed Families Of Appalachian Counties

$10,000

to assist low income families with payment of their energy bills. This year, the CFEBA provided funds to provide weatherization materials and labor to assist residents in decreasing utility costs or increasing efficiency.