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Results: 86 Articles found.
  • Federal coal's day in court

    An obscure decision by a federal judge has prompted an important question for policymakers mulling energy policy: Does federal coal mined in the West have a bigger impact on global climate change than it does on the nation’s economy?

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  • In Illinois, the humble utility pole meets the smart grid

    The wooden utility pole has changed little since it was first used in the mid-19th Century to string telegraph line between cities. At a test site in Champaign, Illinois, though, researchers are getting a glimpse at how the humble utility pole could get a reboot for the smart grid era.

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  • Chinas pressure to stop energy projects dents economic growth in Vietnam

    Vietnam faces a pinch to economic development as China pressures it to stop exploring in a disputed sea for oil and natural gas, two important fuel sources for the fast-growing Southeast Asian country, analysts say. Spanish driller Repsol last month quit a Vietnamese-approved project at Vanguard Bank in the South China Sea, apparently under pressure from China, foreign media reports and political experts say. Now Vietnam is considering a $4.6 billion gas exploration project with ExxonMobil off i​

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  • Virginia Supreme Court makes it easier for utilities to look for renewable energy

    The Virginia Supreme Court has upheld a case that makes it easier for big electric users to shop around for renewable energy. The court upheld an earlier decision by state regulators allowing large customers to purchase 100 percent renewable energy from an independent producer without restrictions.

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  • Can Russia maintain European energy dominance?

    Currently, more than half of the energy consumed in the EU is imported extraterritorially. Of that share, Russia supplies 37.4 percent of gas consumed by the member states. With the decline of domestic resources, this amount is likely to increase. Critics fear that Europe’s energy security is under strain as Moscow has been accused of wielding energy exports as a weapon in conflicts with its neighbors​

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  • Smart transmission: How FERC can spur modernization of the bulk power system

    The world's largest machine needs an upgrade — and it's costing consumers big money. America's 7 million miles of transmission and distribution system wires, often called the planet's biggest networked machine, have an estimated value as high as $2 trillion. Built up over a century, the network supports the world's largest economy, but there are mounting worries it is not keeping up with the times.

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  • Arizona law backed by utilities declaws clean energy mandates

    Arizona utilities could violate the state’s clean energy standards for nominal penalties under a law Gov. Doug Ducey (R) signed March 23. His signature ends less than two weeks of debate among lawmakers over fast-tracked legislation aiming to preemptively declaw higher renewable energy mandates a group wants to bring to voters this year. Arizona’s largest electric utility, Arizona Public Service Co., pushed the measure.

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  • FERC among targets of Iranian hackers charged by DOJ

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission is among the targets of alleged Iranian hackers indicted by the U.S. Justice Department on March 23. Nine members of an Iran-based company stole data from hundreds of universities and dozens of companies around the world, DOJ said, acting in many cases on behalf of Iran's government. The Department of Labor and state governments in Hawaii and Indiana were also targeted.

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  • Russian attacks on energy grid spark alarm

    Revelations about Russian cyberattacks on the U.S. energy grid are sparking new fears in Washington about the growing threat to the energy sector. The developments have some officials worried that Moscow or another nation state could execute a disruptive cyberattack targeting the U.S. power grid.

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  • Energy Secretary Rick Perry says there's 'sheer optimism' in US energy industry despite tariff concerns

    Concerns about trade wars, the future of NAFTA and impending steel and aluminum tariffs loomed over a major energy conference this week, but U.S. Energy Secretary Rick Perry said the overall tone in the energy industry is one of "sheer optimism."

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Results: 86 Articles found.